Franklin Square of Phyladelphia

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The city of Philadelphia can rightly boast of being, perhaps after Boston, the greatest centre of the movement for the independence of America. One of the five original squares built during the late seventeenth century in central Philadelphia, Franklin Square is known all over the United States as a hot spot for every kind of fun and recreation. Its main features include the Philadelphia Park Liberty Carousal, a tiny golf course, playgrounds, and the delicious Square Burger, all surrounding the attractive Franklin Square Fountain. It is, moreover, one of the sites most popular among the citizens for picnics and especially for birthday parties.

You can have an enjoyable ride in the liberty carousal on famous racehorse heroes, can hear tales concerning Franklin Square’s past at the story telling bench, or savour the scrumptious burgers with Cake Shake.—- a tasty blend of icecream and fave, a special kind of cake. 
  
The history of the square dates back to the last decades of the seventeenth century when William Penn, the English Quaker who founded Pennsylvania, a province of the British colony of North America and later to become a state of the USA, in 1682, planned for the establishment of five open public squares in Philadelphia. These squares were situated in such a way that one of them lay in the center and was named Center Square while the other four were located to the northeast, southeast, southwest, and northwest to it. The Center Square is at present the site for the City Hall.

The area where the Northeast Public Square was situated was used in the past for grazing cattle, trading of horses and cattle, military training and parade, storing arms, and also as a burial ground. The Northeast Public Square was renamed Franklin Square in 1825 after Benjamin Franklin— the founding father of the country. It is believed that it was here that he had conducted his remarkable experiment with a kite and key, revealing the nature of electricity carried by clouds. Isamu Nagochi, the notable Japanese American sculptor, has made a sculpture to commemorate this great discovery. The stainless steel sculpture named “Bolt of Light” was installed in 1984, facing the Square at 6th  Street. In 1837, the city government built the Franklin Square Fountain, an exemplary work of marble and the only fountain of William Penn’s five squares that has survived up till now. 

In 2006, a non-profit organization called Historic Philadelphia has devoted its efforts to the park adding several features to it like the Philadelphia Park Liberty Carousal, Philly Mini Golf, and Playgrounds etc. And just in the year 2012, a building suitable for all seasons of the year has been constructed between the Philadelphia Park Liberty Carousal and the Playgrounds. 
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