For A More Efficient Workday, Follow Your Body Clock

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

According to chronobiologists, it’s not just how you get things done that really matters– it’s when.

Whether you’re pitching a new project or asking for a raise, there’s a perfect time of day to do it, says Timothy monk, Ph. D., director of human chronobiology at the University Of Pittsburg School Of Medicine.

“Everyone has a biological clock that controls fluctuating rhythms, such as body temperature, food absorption and hormone levels,” confirms Ronald Portman, MD director of Houston’s Hermann Center of Chronobiology and Chronotherapeutics.  And while everyone’s internal clock is slightly different, scientists say that the most of us have predictable biological patterns we can plan our days around.  Here’s the basic schedule that chronobiology experts recommend we follow:

9 a.mWrite business notes and brainstorm ideas for upcoming projects.  The morning hours are ideal for conceptualizing and being creative.  Reason: Levels of adrenaline and cortisol, stress hormones released by the adrenal glands, peak, jump-starting you day.

10 a.m.Attend a meeting or ask for a raise.  People will be responsive to what you say.  Reason:  Everyone’s alertness and memory are in high gear as blood flows away from the stomach– having aided in digesting breakfast– and is rapidly returning to the brain and other parts of the body.

1 p.m.  Eat a high-protein lunch, such as chicken or salmon, to keep energized.  Reason:  Avoiding carbohydrates decreases the production of the natural sedative, serotonin, which is known to intensify afternoon sluggishness.

2 p.m.  Return phone calls right after lunch or try catching up on your filing and organizing. Reason:  Your alertness level is at its lowest; a drop in body temperature has precipitated a lull in energy.

4 p.m. Read a report or mentally prepare for tomorrow’s meeting with your boss.  Reason:  As body temperature subtly rises between now and 6 p.m., your long term memory is at its sharpest.

For A More Efficient Workday, Follow Your Body Clock

According to chronobiologists, it’s not just how you get things done that really matters– it’s when.

Whether you’re pitching a new project or asking for a raise, there’s a perfect time of day to do it, says Timothy monk, Ph. D., director of human chronobiology at the University Of Pittsburg School Of Medicine.

“Everyone has a biological clock that controls fluctuating rhythms, such as body temperature, food absorption and hormone levels,” confirms Ronald Portman, MD director of Houston’s Hermann Center of Chronobiology and Chronotherapeutics. And while everyone’s internal clock is slightly different, scientists say that the most of us have predictable biological patterns we can plan our days around. Here’s the basic schedule that chronobiology experts recommend we follow:

9 a.m. Write business notes and brainstorm ideas for upcoming projects. The morning hours are ideal for conceptualizing and being creative. Reason: Levels of adrenaline and cortisol, stress hormones released by the adrenal glands, peak, jump-starting you day.

10 a.m.Attend a meeting or ask for a raise. People will be responsive to what you say. Reason: Everyone’s alertness and memory are in high gear as blood flows away from the stomach– having aided in digesting breakfast– and is rapidly returning to the brain and other parts of the body.

1 p.m. Eat a high-protein lunch, such as chicken or salmon, to keep energized. Reason: Avoiding carbohydrates decreases the production of the natural sedative, serotonin, which is known to intensify afternoon sluggishness.

2 p.m. Return phone calls right after lunch or try catching up on your filing and organizing. Reason: Your alertness level is at its lowest; a drop in body temperature has precipitated a lull in energy.

4 p.m. Read a report or mentally prepare for tomorrow’s meeting with your boss. Reason: As body temperature subtly rises between now and 6 p.m., your long term memory is at its sharpest.

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply