Rainy Day

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The natural beauty of the flowers appeared more charming still. A soft pleasant smell pervaded every place. The clouds had nearby cleared by now and a beautiful rainbow had appeared in the sky. Our hearts leapt up with joy to behold its beauty. As the time of sunset approached a soft re light appeared on the western sky. One of my friends was good flute player. He played several popular tunes on his flute to our great delight. Music was specially charming in that pleasant atmosphere.

It continued to rain like cats and dogs for some time more. We waited in the gallery in front of our classroom. Loud thunder still continued, with flashed of lightening for time to time. The sky was covered with black clouds as far as the eyes could see. The gutter spouts were all over-flowing. There was water everywhere.

Intersection near the Gare Saint-Lazare, a railroad station in north Paris. One of Caillebotte’s best known works, it debuted at the Third Impressionist Exhibition of 1877 and is currently owned by the Art Institute of Chicago.Art Institute curator Gloria Groom described the piece as “the great picture of urban life in the late 19th century.”

he second time he performed it on TV was November 18, 1973. Since 1965 he had been doing one television special a year—this one followed a two year break for his retirement. The show, “Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back,” features “Here’s That Rainy Day” in a dramatic, moody set–piece medley with “Last Night When We Were Young” and “Violets for Your Furs.” Here the set is an empty, almost abstract bar with a slowly turning fan overhead. Sinatra makes the three songs into a dramatic statement.(See the show on

The beauty of the garden refreshed our minds and souls. A soft, pleasant breeze was blowing. All the trees and plants that had been just washed appeared very beautiful and pleasant. he most auspicious hour for the ablution is determined by astrologers in the service of the Je Khenpo, the chief abbot of the country. They refer to the Bhutanese lunar calendar (essentially the Tibetan lunar calendar), but the exact method of their calculations have not been disclosed. In 2004, they determined the preferred time to be 4:00 p.m., September 22. Citizens who are unable to bathe at the exact hour instead often rise before dawn for a brisk morning splash.

Caillebotte’s interest in photography is evident in the painting. The figures in the foreground appear slightly “out of focus”, those in the mid-distance (the carriage and the pedestrians in the middle of the intersection) have sharp edges, and then the background becomes progressively indistinct.

was well protected by my raincoat, out other students were not so lucky. When I reached the school, I found that the attendance was very thin and most of the students, who had come, were fully drenched. As the downpour continued, the college had to be closed for the day. We were all very glad to have a holiday.

As he insists that it isn’t going to rain that day the sky suddenly clouds over and a thunder storm rapidly approaches. He reluctantly goes inside to inspect the hole, plugging it with his finger to demonstrate that water wouldn’t come in through such a small opening. Waiting until his wife has left, Father tries to remove his finger, only to find that it has become stuck. He manages to release it whilst also bringing down a section of the roof on his head, leaving a now massive hole. His attempts to set to work are hampered by a series of clumsy mishaps which infuriate him further. Poking her head into the room, Mother tells Father to relax and count to 10, an exercise which ends with him covered in red paint from a paint can that he furiously kicked.

Downstairs in the kitchen, Mother tells their son, Wilbur, to fetch Father a drink of water from the well, as Father struggles to get out onto the roof without damaging it further. The storm finally hits and he is caught in a deluge of rain, as well as struggling with lightning and fierce winds that blow the roof tiles into massive ‘waves’

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