Cheshta’s Encounter With Breast Cancer – Indraprastha Apollo Hospital

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

CHESHTA Sood’s optimism is infectious. A few minutes spent with her make you realise that no disease stands a chance against positive thinking, including Cheshta’s own encounter with breast cancer. Married at 20, children before 30, an active lifestyle and a stress-free life. Cheshta Sood was living healthy…until September 2010, when she randomly felt a lump in her breast. A practical and strong-minded person by nature, her first reaction was not to press the panic button. She calmly went for a mammography at Indraprastha Apollo Hospital. “After the mammography results were out, I was told the pictures were not very clear. They asked me to undergo an ultrasound for a better result,” says Cheshta.

When the ultrasound pictures came, the doctors told her that clarity was still an issue and they advised a FNAC test. “This was when they told me the lump was malignant,” she says. Her reaction: exasperation. “I am a vegetarian, a non­smoker, non-drinker. I’ve been very healthy and active. I was a state level sportsperson, a kathak dancer. Why was this even happening?” My husband and family were hurt and disturbed. But like me, my sons are strong.

It was through a friend that Cheshta heard of Dr Ramesh Sarin, senior consultant, surgical oncology, Indraprastha Apollo hospital, New Delhi. And she went to her. Cheshta and her family were overwhelmed by her experience and opti­mism. “Just by a physical examination, Dr Sarin told me that the lump seemed malignant!” says Cheshta. “Her unending positive energy made me forget that i had cancer!

“I told Cheshta that a breast saving surgery was not possible but chemotherapy could reduce the size of the lump before surgery,” she says. A very disturbed Cheshta’s response was “Why me?” In cases like these, Sarin is a staunch believer in being honest about the problem. She spent time with Cheshta explaining the treatment and instilling hope. “I told her that cancer IS curable and she would be fine. That she would be Cheshta even without a breast. Her love for her family, the person she was, would never change. Plus, options like silicon bras were also available to help overcome her feminine worries.”

As per the treatment plan, Cheshta underwent a few sessions of chemotherapy and then mastectomy on Sep­tember 14, 2010. Her chemo sessions continued until January, 2011 and she has six more sessions of radiation therapy left. But she and her healer are overjoyed to have conquered cancer together.

CHESHTA Sood’s optimism is infectious. A few minutes spent with her make you realise that no disease stands a chance against positive thinking, including Cheshta’s own encounter with breast cancer. Married at 20, children before 30, an active lifestyle and a stress-free life. Cheshta Sood was living healthy…until September 2010, when she randomly felt a lump in her breast. A practical and strong-minded person by nature, her first reaction was not to press the panic button. She calmly went for a mammography at Indraprastha Apollo Hospital. “After the mammography results were out, I was told the pictures were not very clear. They asked me to undergo an ultrasound for a better result,” says Cheshta.

When the ultrasound pictures came, the doctors told her that clarity was still an issue and they advised a FNAC test. “This was when they told me the lump was malignant,” she says. Her reaction: exasperation. “I am a vegetarian, a non­smoker, non-drinker. I’ve been very healthy and active. I was a state level sportsperson, a kathak dancer. Why was this even happening?” My husband and family were hurt and disturbed. But like me, my sons are strong.

It was through a friend that Cheshta heard of Dr Ramesh Sarin, senior consultant, surgical oncology, Indraprastha Apollo hospital, New Delhi. And she went to her. Cheshta and her family were overwhelmed by her experience and opti­mism. “Just by a physical examination, Dr Sarin told me that the lump seemed malignant!” says Cheshta. “Her unending positive energy made me forget that i had cancer!

“I told Cheshta that a breast saving surgery was not possible but chemotherapy could reduce the size of the lump before surgery,” she says. A very disturbed Cheshta’s response was “Why me?” In cases like these, Sarin is a staunch believer in being honest about the problem. She spent time with Cheshta explaining the treatment and instilling hope. “I told her that cancer IS curable and she would be fine. That she would be Cheshta even without a breast. Her love for her family, the person she was, would never change. Plus, options like silicon bras were also available to help overcome her feminine worries.”

As per the treatment plan, Cheshta underwent a few sessions of chemotherapy and then mastectomy on Sep­tember 14, 2010. Her chemo sessions continued until January, 2011 and she has six more sessions of radiation therapy left. But she and her healer are overjoyed to have conquered cancer together.

CHESHTA Sood’s optimism is infectious. A few minutes spent with her make you realise that no disease stands a chance against positive thinking, including Cheshta’s own encounter with breast cancer. Married at 20, children before 30, an active lifestyle and a stress-free life. Cheshta Sood was living healthy…until September 2010, when she randomly felt a lump in her breast. A practical and strong-minded person by nature, her first reaction was not to press the panic button. She calmly went for a mammography at Indraprastha Apollo Hospital. “After the mammography results were out, I was told the pictures were not very clear. They asked me to undergo an ultrasound for a better result,” says Cheshta.

When the ultrasound pictures came, the doctors told her that clarity was still an issue and they advised a FNAC test. “This was when they told me the lump was malignant,” she says. Her reaction: exasperation. “I am a vegetarian, a non­smoker, non-drinker. I’ve been very healthy and active. I was a state level sportsperson, a kathak dancer. Why was this even happening?” My husband and family were hurt and disturbed. But like me, my sons are strong.

It was through a friend that Cheshta heard of Dr Ramesh Sarin, senior consultant, surgical oncology, Indraprastha Apollo hospital, New Delhi. And she went to her. Cheshta and her family were overwhelmed by her experience and opti­mism. “Just by a physical examination, Dr Sarin told me that the lump seemed malignant!” says Cheshta. “Her unending positive energy made me forget that i had cancer!

“I told Cheshta that a breast saving surgery was not possible but chemotherapy could reduce the size of the lump before surgery,” she says. A very disturbed Cheshta’s response was “Why me?” In cases like these, Sarin is a staunch believer in being honest about the problem. She spent time with Cheshta explaining the treatment and instilling hope. “I told her that cancer IS curable and she would be fine. That she would be Cheshta even without a breast. Her love for her family, the person she was, would never change. Plus, options like silicon bras were also available to help overcome her feminine worries.”

As per the treatment plan, Cheshta underwent a few sessions of chemotherapy and then mastectomy on Sep­tember 14, 2010. Her chemo sessions continued until January, 2011 and she has six more sessions of radiation therapy left. But she and her healer are overjoyed to have conquered cancer together.

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply