Tips on Feeding Your Grown up Puppy

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Now is the time to cut the bedtime feeding and hand only two meals each day: morning and late afternoon or early evening. The quantity of food he consumes, however, must be increased to cover for the dropped meal and also for his rapid growth places an extra demand on the puppy at this point.

The amount of food needed depends on the individual puppy, the extent of his activity, exercise, size, and weight.

A significant point is that about three-fourths of your puppy’s diet must consist of a balanced, prepared dog food that will afford him all the needed food elements. You will perhaps be able to determine the amount of food necessary to keep your puppy satisfied and in sound weight, neither too fat nor too thin, by watching him. The feeding chart, according to the puppy’s weight and caloric need, can help as a guide.

There is a technique called self-feeding where in dry dog meal is kept out for the dog to gnaw at will. Although self-feeding more often suits to the kennel owner, it can also be conformed to house pets, particularly when the owners are away throughout the day.

Bones—should they or should they not be given to your dog? Let us take into account the negatives: bones give little nourishment, may cause constipation, and can irritate or might tear the digestive tract if swallowed. Uninterrupted gnawing of bones wears down the teeth. On the positive side, bones offer chewing exercise and most dogs savor them greatly. At one time bones were believed quite beneficial for dogs, but today they’re looked upon as more high-risk than nutritious. Most pet owners give synthetic or rawhide bones instead to gratify their dogs’ chewing urge. If you prefer to give real bones to your dog, though, restrict the number to about one a week. Never give him a bone close his regular feeding time. And only give a well-cooked huge bone, like a beef shank or knuckle bone, that won’t splinter. Poultry, chop, and other little bones are a bit sharp; they can splinter or be swallowed and do grave harm.

Don’t forget that your dog demands water as well as food. In fact, a dog can endure without food a great deal longer than he can without water. Keep fresh water in a bowl where he can drink whenever unless you make it a practice to offer a drink many times a day. The water should be renewed often, especially in hot weather when it can quickly turn warm or fouled by insects.

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