Abuse Towards Women

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Domestic violence toward women: Recognize the patterns and seek help
Domestic abuse can happen to anyone, regardless of age, economic status, race and educational background. Find out how to recognize an abusive relationship and what resources are available to help.
He says he‘s sorry and that it won‘t happen again. But you fear it will. Angry outbursts, hurtful words, sometimes a slap or a punch. You may start to doubt your own judgment, or wonder whether you‘re going crazy. Maybe you think you‘ve imagined the whole thing.
But you haven‘t. Domestic violence can and does happen to people of all ages, races, and socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. Domestic violence happens to men and to same-sex partners, but most often domestic violence involves men abusing their female partners. In fact, the Department of Health and Human Services estimates that as many as 4 million women suffer abuse from their husbands, ex-husbands, boyfriends or intimate partners in the United States each year.
Domestic violence — also called domestic abuse, intimate partner violence or battering — occurs between people in intimate relationships. It takes many forms, including coercion, threats, intimidation, isolation, and emotional, sexual and physical abuse.
Without help, abuse will continue and could worsen. Many resources are available to help you understand your options and to support you. No one deserves to be abused.
An abusive relationship: It‘s about power and control
Though there are no typical victims of domestic violence, abusive relationships do share similar characteristics. In all cases, the abuser aims to exert power and control over his partner.
Breaking the cycle: Difficult, but doable with help
Domestic violence is part of a continuing cycle that‘s difficult to break.
So it‘s important to recognize that you may not be in a position to resolve the situation on your own. You may need outside help, and that‘s OK. Without help, the abuse will likely continue. Leaving the abusive relationship may be the only way to break the cycle.

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