Top 10 Fictional Male Charmers

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10. Sir Lancelot

Sir Lancelot (or Launcelot) du Lac is one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. He is typically considered to be one of the greatest and most trusted of King Arthur’s knights and plays a part in many of Arthur’s victories. He is perhaps most famous for being intimate with Arthur’s wife Guinevere and the role he plays in the search for the Holy Grail.  

Lancelot’s life and adventures are featured in several Medieval romances, often with conflicting backstories and chains of events. His first appearance as a main character is in Chrétien de Troyes’ Le Chevalier de la Charette, or “Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart”, dating from the 12th century. In the 13th century, he figures prominently in the lengthy Vulgate Cycle, with the majority of his more famous exploits occurring in the section known as the Prose Lancelot. -Wikipedia.org

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9. Han Solo

Han Solo, played by Harrison Ford, is a fictional smuggler and “reckless mercenary” in the Star Wars franchise. Introduced in the film Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977), Solo and his Wookiee first mate, Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew), become involved in the Rebel Alliance against the authoritarian Galactic Empire. Over the course of the Star Wars franchise, Solo becomes a chief figure in the Alliance and succeeding galactic governments. Star Wars creator George Lucas described Solo as “a loner who realizes the importance of being part of a group and helping for the common good.”

Han Solo remains one of cinema’s most revered movie characters. The American Film Institute ranked Solo as the 14th greatest film hero. He was also deemed the 4th greatest movie character of all-time by Empire magazine. Entertainment Weekly ranked the character 7th on their list of The All-Time Coolest Heroes in Pop Culture. On their list of the 100 Greatest Fictional Characters, Fandomania.com ranked Solo at number 15. -Wikipedia.org

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8. Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray is the only published novel by Oscar Wilde, appearing as the lead story in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890, printed as the July 1890 issue of this magazine. Wilde later revised this edition, making several alterations, and adding new chapters; the amended version was published by Ward, Lock, and Company in April 1891. The title is often translated The Portrait of Dorian Gray. The novel tells of a young man named Dorian Gray, the subject of a painting by artist Basil Hallward.

Basil is impressed by Dorian’s beauty and becomes infatuated with him, believing his beauty is responsible for a new mode in his art. Dorian meets Lord Henry Wotton, a friend of Basil’s, and becomes enthralled by Lord Henry’s world view. Espousing a new hedonism, Lord Henry suggests the only things worth pursuing in life are beauty and fulfillment of the senses.

Realizing that one day his beauty will fade, Dorian (whimsily) expresses a desire to sell his soul to ensure the portrait, Basil has painted, would age rather than himself. Dorian’s wish is fulfilled, plunging him into debauched acts. The portrait serves as a reminder of the effect each act has upon his soul, with each sin displayed as a disfigurement of his form, or through a sign of aging. The Picture of Dorian Gray is considered a work of classic gothic horror fiction with a strong Faustian theme. -Wikipedia.org

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7. Ferris Bueller

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is a 1986 American teen coming-of-age comedy film written and directed by John Hughes. It stars Matthew Broderick, Alan Ruck, Mia Sara, Jeffrey Jones and Jennifer Grey. The film follows high school senior Ferris Bueller, who decides to skip school and spend the day in downtown Chicago. Accompanied by his girlfriend Sloane Peterson and his best friend Cameron Frye, he creatively avoids his school’s Dean of Students Edward Rooney, his resentful sister Jeanie, and his parents. During the film, Broderick occasionally breaks the fourth wall by speaking directly to the camera to explain to the audience his character’s techniques and thoughts.  

Hughes wrote the screenplay in less than a week and shot the film – on a budget of $6 million – over several months in late 1985. Featuring many famous Chicago landmarks including the then Sears Tower and the Art Institute of Chicago, the film was Hughes’ love letter to the city: “I really wanted to capture as much of Chicago as I could. Not just in the architecture and landscape, but the spirit.” Released by Paramount Pictures on June 11, 1986, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off became one of the top grossing films of the year and was enthusiastically received by critics and audiences alike. -Wikipedia.org

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6. Count Dracula

Count Dracula is a fictional character, the titular antagonist of Bram Stoker’s 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula and archetypal vampire. Some aspects of his character may have been inspired by the 15th century Romanian general and Wallachian Prince Vlad III the Impaler. In the United States the character became public domain in 1899 and consequently appears frequently in all manner of popular culture, from films to animated media to breakfast cereals.

Dracula is very passionate about his warrior heritage, emotionally proclaiming his pride to Harker on how the Székely people are infused with the blood of multiple heroes. He does express an interest in the history of the British Empire, speaking admiringly of its people. He has a somewhat primal and predatory world view; he pities ordinary humans for their revulsion to their darker impulses.  Though usually portrayed as having a strong Eastern European accent, the original novel only specifies that his spoken English is excellent, though strangely toned. -Wikipedia.org

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5. Jay Gatsby

Jay Gatsby is the titular character of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby. The character has become an archetype of self-made American men seeking to join high society and the name has become synonymous with successful businessmen with shady pasts in the US. James “Jimmy” Gatz, a bright young man from a poor family in North Dakota, despised the imprecations of poverty so much he dropped out of St. Olaf College  in Minnesota after only a few weeks because of his shame at the janitorial job he had to take to pay his way. Renaming himself Jay Gatsby, he learns the ways of the wealthy while working for a copper tycoon named Dan Cody, but upon Cody’s death is cheated of a $25,000 bequest by Cody’s mistress.

While training in 1917 to join the infantry and fight in World War I  he meets and promptly falls in love with the beautiful Daisy, who represents everything he is not: she is rich, from a patrician East Coast family and born with the proverbial silver spoon in her mouth. During the war he reaches the rank of Major, commands the heavy machine guns of his regiment, and is decorated “for valour” for his participation in the bloody battles of Marne and Argonne. After the war, he attends Trinity College, Oxford. While there he receives a letter from Daisy telling him she has married the equally aristocratic Tom Buchanan. Rather than admit defeat, he commits his life to becoming a man of the sort of wealth and stature he imagines could win her love. -Wikipedia.org

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4. Rhett Butler

Rhett Butler is a fictional character and one of the main protagonists of Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. In the course of the novel, Rhett becomes increasingly enamored with Scarlett’s sheer will  to survive in the chaos surrounding the war. The novel contains several pieces of information about him that do not appear in the film. After being disowned by his family (mainly by his father), he became a professional gambler, and at one point was involved in the California Gold Rush, where he ended up getting a scar on his stomach in a knife fight. He seems to love his mother and his sister Rosemary, but has an adversarial relationship with his father which is never resolved.

He also has a younger brother who is never named, and a sister-in-law (both of whom he has little respect or regard for), who own a rice plantation. Rhett is the guardian of a little boy who attends boarding school in New Orleans; it is speculated among readers that this boy is Belle Watling’s son (whom Belle mentions briefly to Melanie), and perhaps Rhett’s illegitimate son as well.  Despite being thrown out of West Point, the Rhett of the novel is obviously very well-educated, referencing everything from Shakespeare to classical history to German philosophy. He has an understanding of human nature that the obtuse Scarlett never does, and at several points provides insightful perspectives on other characters.

He also has an extensive knowledge of women, both physically and psychologically, which Scarlett does not consider to be “decent”. Rhett has tremendous respect and (gradually) affection for Melanie as a friend, but very little for Ashley. Rhett’s understanding of human nature extends to children as well, and he is a much better parent to Scarlett’s children from her previous marriages than she is herself; he has a particular affinity with her son Wade, even before Wade is his stepson. When Bonnie is born Rhett showers her with the attention that Scarlett will no longer allow him to give to her and is a devoted father. -Wikipedia.org

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3. Mr. Darcy

Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy is a fictional character and one of two protagonists in Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice. He is an archetype of the aloof romantic hero, and a romantic interest of Elizabeth Bennet, the novel’s main protagonist. The story’s narration is almost exclusively from Elizabeth’s perspective; she is portrayed as the sympathetic figure, and Darcy hardly so at all until the later chapters of the novel —as knowledge and ironic events are revealed to Elizabeth.

Usually referred to only as “Mr. Darcy”, his first name is mentioned twice in the novel. In the novel, Mr. Darcy is a wealthy gentleman with an income exceeding £10,000 a year, and the proprietor of Pemberley, a large estate in Derbyshire, England. Darcy slights Elizabeth Bennet  at their first meeting, but then is attracted to her, and later begins to court her (in his own way) while struggling against his continued feelings of superiority. Ironically, when Darcy realizes his friend Bingley is seriously courting Elizabeth’s elder sister Jane, he disapproves, and subtly persuades Bingley that Jane does not return his feelings (which he honestly believed).

He later explains this seeming hypocrisy by asserting “I was kinder to [Mr.Bingley] than to myself”. Although he doesn’t realize it, Darcy’s interference in Bingley and Jane’s budding relationship has caused Elizabeth to dislike him intensely. -Wikipedia.org

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2. Don Juan

Don Juan (Spanish, or Don Giovanni in Italian) is a legendary, fictional libertine whose story has been told many times by many authors. El burlador de Sevilla y convidado de piedra (The Trickster of Seville and the Stone Guest) by Tirso de Molina  is a play set in the fourteenth century that was published in Spain around 1630. Evidence suggests it is the first written version of the Don Juan legend.

Among the best known works about this character today are Molière’s play Dom Juan ou le Festin de pierre (1665), Byron’s epic poem Don Juan (1821), José de Espronceda’s poem El estudiante de Salamanca (1840) and José Zorrilla’s play Don Juan Tenorio (1844). The most influential version of all is Don Giovanni, an opera composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, first performed in Prague in 1787 (with Giacomo Casanova probably in the audience) and itself the source of inspiration for works by E. T. A. Hoffmann, Alexander Pushkin, Søren Kierkegaard, George Bernard Shaw and Albert Camus.  Don Juan is used synonymously for “womanizer”, especially in Spanish slang, and the term Don Juanism is sometimes used as a synonym for satyriasis. -Wikipedia.org

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1. James Bond

James Bond 007 is a fictional character created in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, who featured him in twelve novels and two short story collections. The character has also been used in the longest running and most financially successful English-language film franchise to date, starting in 1962 with Dr. No. After Fleming’s death in 1964, subsequent James Bond novels were written by Kingsley Amis, John Gardner, Raymond Benson and Sebastian Faulks.

Moreover, Christopher Wood novelised two screenplays, Charlie Higson wrote a series on a young James Bond while other writers have authored unofficial versions of the character. There have been 22 films in the EON Productions series to date, the most recent of which, Quantum of Solace, was released on 31 October 2008 (UK). In addition there has been an American television adaptation and two independent feature productions. Apart from movies and television, James Bond has also been adapted for many other media, including radio plays, comic strips and video games. -Wikipedia.org

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