Out-Of-Body Experience

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An out-of-body experience (OBE) is characterized by a feeling of departing from one’s physical body and observing both one’s self and the world from outside one’s body. The experience is quite common in dreams, daydreams, and memories, where we quite often take the external perspective. Some OBEs coincide with lucid dreaming. Some people experience an OBE while under the influence of an anesthetic or while semi-conscious due to trauma. Some people have an OBE while under the influence of drugs. OBEs have been induced by  electrically stimulating the right angular gyrus (located at the juncture of the temporal and parietal lobes).*  Finally, some people experience an OBE when they are near death (near-death experiences or NDEs).

Susan Blackmore, a former parapsychologist with heavy skeptical leanings, is considered one of the world’s leading authorities on OBEs and NDEs. She had an OBE while attending Oxford University during the early 1970s. By her own admission she “spent much of the time stoned, experimenting with different drugs” (Shermer 1998). During her first year at Oxford she had an OBE after several hours on the Ouija board while stoned on marijuana. The experience also occurred during a period of her life when sleep deprivation was common for her. She describes herself as having been in “a fairly peculiar state of mind” when she had the OBE (ibid.).

Susan Blackmore, a former parapsychologist with heavy skeptical leanings, is considered one of the world’s leading authorities on OBEs and NDEs. She had an OBE while attending Oxford University during the early 1970s. By her own admission she “spent much of the time stoned, experimenting with different drugs” (Shermer 1998). During her first year at Oxford she had an OBE after several hours on the Ouija board while stoned on marijuana. The experience also occurred during a period of her life when sleep deprivation was common for her. She describes herself as having been in “a fairly peculiar state of mind” when she had the OBE (ibid.).An out-of-body experience (OBE) is characterized by a feeling of departing from one’s physical body and observing both one’s self and the world from outside one’s body. The experience is quite common in dreams, daydreams, and memories, where we quite often take the external perspective. Some OBEs coincide with lucid dreaming. Some people experience an OBE while under the influence of an anesthetic or while semi-conscious due to trauma. Some people have an OBE while under the influence of drugs. OBEs have been induced by  electrically stimulating the right angular gyrus (located at the juncture of the temporal and parietal lobes).*  Finally, some people experience an OBE when they are near death (near-death experiences or NDEs).

Susan Blackmore, a former parapsychologist with heavy skeptical leanings, is considered one of the world’s leading authorities on OBEs and NDEs. She had an OBE while attending Oxford University during the early 1970s. By her own admission she “spent much of the time stoned, experimenting with different drugs” (Shermer 1998). During her first year at Oxford she had an OBE after several hours on the Ouija board while stoned on marijuana. The experience also occurred during a period of her life when sleep deprivation was common for her. She describes herself as having been in “a fairly peculiar state of mind” when she had the OBE (ibid.).

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