John Knox And The Church of England: His Work in Her Pulpit

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Welcome to the Still Waters Revival Books video book summary for “John Knox and the Church of England: His Work in Her Pulpit and His Influence Upon Her Liturgy, Articles, and Parties” (1875) by Peter Lorimer

“The ‘three mighties’ in the army of the Reformation, are undoubtedly Martin Luther, John Calvin, and John Knox. Each of the three has his appropriate place and his peculiar work. Luther cleared the ground; Calvin exhibited the plan of the new edifice; Knox was the workman who erected it.” (J.A. Wylie, “Ter-centenary of the Scottish Reformation,” p. 73, this book is listed under “Cunningham” at PuritanDownloads.com).

Here Lorimer gives us an important look at a major chapter in the life of Christ’s Reformation “workman,” as founded upon several important papers of Knox never before published. Kyle elaborates: “After the publication of Laing’s collection, three smaller Knoxian writings were discovered. In 1875 these tracts were reprinted as part of Peter Lorimer’s book John Knox and the Church of England. Scholarly criticism has verified John Knox’s authorship of these articles” (“The Mind of John Knox,” p. 14).

Lorimer himself says that “[t]he amount of fresh biographical and historical material supplied by these papers is so very considerable that it appeared to warrant and suggest a re-writing of the English chapter of Knox’s life.” Furthermore, he continues, that though Knox is too often thought of only in connection “with his work and success as the Reformer of Scotland,” it should be remembered that “a large portion of the best and most energetic part of his life was spent in England, and among Englishmen out of England.”

Written as a Monograph to “make larger and freer use of Knox’s own writings, in the way of culling their most personal and characteristic passages,” Lorimer intimates, “I wished, as much as possible, to let Knox himself be seen and heard in my book.” Kevin Reed, one of the foremost Knox scholars alive today, calls this work “an excellent account of Knox’s ministry in England” (“John Knox the Forgotten Reformer,” p. 19. In print from Presbyterian Heritage Publications on the PHP CD).

A great supplement to any study of Knox.

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