In-Ground Swimming Pool Choices – Vinyl Liner Pools Pros And Cons

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The Vinyl Liner Pool

There are three basic kinds of in-ground swimming pools, the concrete or gunite swimming pool, the vinyl liner style, and fiberglass.  The one that is most often installed in residential applications is the vinyl liner pool.  There are three reasons why this kind of pool is selected so often.

1. Cost – This might not be the primary reason, but it is an important one.  The liner, which is a heavy rubber product, is much less expensive than the other products that pools can be made from.

2. Comfortable Feel – Concrete pools are hard, and if you bang your head on the side, it is going to hurt.  The vinyl liner is soft and gives when you butt against it.  There is a dry pack of cement based material on the earth side of the liner, but it is still softer than other pool materials.

3. Ease of Cleaning – With the proper cleaning tools, a vinyl liner is relatively easy to keep clean because the surface is harder for the algae and bacteria to attach themselves to.  Any other material has crevices that make it easier for the green and black algae substance to take hold.

Other parts of a vinyl liner pool are much the same as any other kind of swimming pool.  The filtration system, pump, swimming pool fence, and concrete decks are all installed in much the same way as those on concrete or fiberglass pools.

Problems That Occur With Vinyl Liner Pools

The only real downside of the vinyl liner swimming pool is the liner.  Most of these come with a 25 or 30 year warranty, which sounds good at first.  The warranty is prorated much the same as a car tire, which translates to replacements in the first few years as being close to the total cost of the liner.

After 7 years, a failed liner will result in a payment of about 10% of the original cost.  This is close to the average life of most vinyl liners.  Taking into consideration the average cost of $1,200 to $1,400 for a new liner, the expense of the water to fill the pool, and the labor to replace the liner, the owner can pay out over $2,500 for the first new replacement liner.

Someone with a sharp object can ruin a brand new pool liner.  There are repairs that can be made, but the labor has to be paid for and the water has to be lowered to where the rip or tear is for repair.

The average life of an in-ground vinyl liner swimming pool is between 8 and 12 years, and some have lasted almost 20.  Above-ground swimming pools have an average lifetime of 6 to 10 years.

Several factors contribute to the length of service that can be expected from rubber products.  The chemistry of the water has an effect on the liner as well as the chemicals used to keep the water clear and clean.  Of course, luck and chance are contributors, too, as well as the quality of the liner.

Letting the water out of a vinyl liner pool is a big mistake because ground water can creep in and float the liner up, making it extremely hard to get it back in place without professional help.

All swimming pools have some faults and upkeep costs, and nothing lasts forever. It’s a good idea to speak to others about building swimming pools and get their thoughts on what they do and do not like about their chosen type of pool.

There are three basic kinds of in-ground swimming pools, the concrete or gunite swimming pool, the vinyl liner style, and fiberglass.  The one that is most often installed in residential applications is the vinyl liner pool.  There are three reasons why this kind of pool is selected so often.

1. Cost – This might not be the primary reason, but it is an important one.  The liner, which is a heavy rubber product, is much less expensive than the other products that pools can be made from.

2. Comfortable Feel – Concrete pools are hard, and if you bang your head on the side, it is going to hurt.  The vinyl liner is soft and gives when you butt against it.  There is a dry pack of cement based material on the earth side of the liner, but it is still softer than other pool materials.

3. Ease of Cleaning – With the proper cleaning tools, a vinyl liner is relatively easy to keep clean because the surface is harder for the algae and bacteria to attach themselves to.  Any other material has crevices that make it easier for the green and black algae substance to take hold.

Other parts of a vinyl liner pool are much the same as any other kind of swimming pool.  The filtration system, pump, swimming pool fence, and concrete decks are all installed in much the same way as those on concrete or fiberglass pools.

Problems That Occur With Vinyl Liner Pools

The only real downside of the vinyl liner swimming pool is the liner.  Most of these come with a 25 or 30 year warranty, which sounds good at first.  The warranty is prorated much the same as a car tire, which translates to replacements in the first few years as being close to the total cost of the liner.

After 7 years, a failed liner will result in a payment of about 10% of the original cost.  This is close to the average life of most vinyl liners.  Taking into consideration the average cost of $1,200 to $1,400 for a new liner, the expense of the water to fill the pool, and the labor to replace the liner, the owner can pay out over $2,500 for the first new replacement liner.

Someone with a sharp object can ruin a brand new pool liner.  There are repairs that can be made, but the labor has to be paid for and the water has to be lowered to where the rip or tear is for repair.

The average life of an in-ground vinyl liner swimming pool is between 8 and 12 years, and some have lasted almost 20.  Above-ground swimming pools have an average lifetime of 6 to 10 years.

Several factors contribute to the length of service that can be expected from rubber products.  The chemistry of the water has an effect on the liner as well as the chemicals used to keep the water clear and clean.  Of course, luck and chance are contributors, too, as well as the quality of the liner.

Letting the water out of a vinyl liner pool is a big mistake because ground water can creep in and float the liner up, making it extremely hard to get it back in place without professional help.

All swimming pools have some faults and upkeep costs, and nothing lasts forever. It’s a good idea to speak to others with swimming pools and get their thoughts on what they do and do not like about their chosen type of pool.

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