Saturday, December 16

The Modern Shopping Centre

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

The modern shopping centre offers us a most comprehensive and revealing insight as to the state of modern society. The immediate social and cultural divides are exemplified via separations which are reassuringly distinct and subtly enforced. The behemoth of materialism is such that it undermines and simultaneously fuels the overwhelming need to assume a persona. The deity-like voice of big brother announces to us the inadequacy of individuality and being ourselves. Mere presence in such havens is enough to subtly yet inextricably reinforce the unrelenting belief that “I” does not exist without “we”. Labels are necessary when defining any product, more sensitive however when applied to people of reason and (un)-consciousness. Identity theft is a criminal offence; can any of us conceive of buying our personality back from the thief? This is undoubtedly the source of the ultimate offence the modern Shopping centre stands accountable for. Incessant advertising and the proliferation of indoctrinated images of perfection contribute to the ultimate sentiment “you are not good enough” delivered by the modern shopping centre.Intrinsically, the modern shopping centre is a most un-Irish concept. Values previously deplored are shamelessly and somewhat attractively displayed. The visit of Pope John Paul the second to Ireland in the oppressive depths of the eighties are but a rumour and a half-remembered dream. His prophetic speech in Dublin’s Phoenix Park warned of the ills of gross and profane materialism. The Irish were inspired by this, possibly even picking up a few new ideas. The modern shopping centre in Ireland prowled triumphantly over bog lands and Churchyards to the elevated position it holds today. Traditionally associated with the loose morals and veritably “disposable” income of Celtic Tiger Ireland, it is the epitome of prosperity and success. However, nay saying, misery and begrudgery are such integral national traits that certain figures refused to join in the collective party an assembly of pariah’s, misfits and a marked exception to the rule.Hypothetically, the rise of the modern shopping centre can be equated with the failing influence of the Catholic Church in Irish society. What could better fulfil the vacuum (moral or otherwise), satisfying the social and spiritual needs of the “new-Irish”? The inversely proportional relationship between money and morals is intrinsically linked with the rise of Dundrum Town Centre, BT” and inevitably Starbucks in Ireland. It is problematic of course to worship at the altar of consumerism without a Cafe Latte in hand. Embrace these luminous beacons of globalisation, closely linked with the corporate takeover of society, loss of cultural Identity and the rarity of the individual.

The Modern Shopping Centre

Hypothetically, the rise of the modern shopping centre can be equated with the failing influence of the Catholic Church in Irish society. What could better fulfil the vacuum (moral or otherwise), satisfying the social and spiritual needs of the “new-Irish”? The inversely proportional relationship between money and morals is intrinsically linked with the rise of Dundrum Town Centre, BT” and inevitably Starbucks in Ireland. It is problematic of course to worship at the altar of consumerism without a Cafe Latte in hand. Embrace these luminous beacons of globalisation, closely linked with the corporate takeover of society, loss of cultural Identity and the rarity of the individual.

Intrinsically, the modern shopping centre is a most un-Irish concept. Values previously deplored are shamelessly and somewhat attractively displayed. The visit of Pope John Paul the second to Ireland in the oppressive depths of the eighties are but a rumour and a half-remembered dream. His prophetic speech in Dublin’s Phoenix Park warned of the ills of gross and profane materialism. The Irish were inspired by this, possibly even picking up a few new ideas. The modern shopping centre in Ireland prowled triumphantly over bog lands and Churchyards to the elevated position it holds today. Traditionally associated with the loose morals and veritably “disposable” income of Celtic Tiger Ireland, it is the epitome of prosperity and success. However, nay saying, misery and begrudgery are such integral national traits that certain figures refused to join in the collective party an assembly of pariah’s, misfits and a marked exception to the rule.

The modern shopping centre offers us a most comprehensive and revealing insight as to the state of modern society. The immediate social and cultural divides are exemplified via separations which are reassuringly distinct and subtly enforced. The behemoth of materialism is such that it undermines and simultaneously fuels the overwhelming need to assume a persona. The deity-like voice of big brother announces to us the inadequacy of individuality and being ourselves. Mere presence in such havens is enough to subtly yet inextricably reinforce the unrelenting belief that “I” does not exist without “we”. Labels are necessary when defining any product, more sensitive however when applied to people of reason and (un)-consciousness. Identity theft is a criminal offence; can any of us conceive of buying our personality back from the thief? This is undoubtedly the source of the ultimate offence the modern Shopping centre stands accountable for. Incessant advertising and the proliferation of indoctrinated images of perfection contribute to the ultimate sentiment “you are not good enough” delivered by the modern shopping centre.

Hypothetically, the rise of the modern shopping centre can be equated with the failing influence of the Catholic Church in Irish society. What could better fulfil the vacuum (moral or otherwise), satisfying the social and spiritual needs of the “new-Irish”? The inversely proportional relationship between money and morals is intrinsically linked with the rise of Dundrum Town Centre, BT” and inevitably Starbucks in Ireland. It is problematic of course to worship at the altar of consumerism without a Cafe Latte in hand. Embrace these luminous beacons of globalisation, closely linked with the corporate takeover of society, loss of cultural Identity and the rarity of the individual.

Intrinsically, the modern shopping centre is a most un-Irish concept. Values previously deplored are shamelessly and somewhat attractively displayed. The visit of Pope John Paul the second to Ireland in the oppressive depths of the eighties are but a rumour and a half-remembered dream. His prophetic speech in Dublin’s Phoenix Park warned of the ills of gross and profane materialism. The Irish were inspired by this, possibly even picking up a few new ideas. The modern shopping centre in Ireland prowled triumphantly over bog lands and Churchyards to the elevated position it holds today. Traditionally associated with the loose morals and veritably “disposable” income of Celtic Tiger Ireland, it is the epitome of prosperity and success. However, nay saying, misery and begrudgery are such integral national traits that certain figures refused to join in the collective party an assembly of pariah’s, misfits and a marked exception to the rule.

The modern shopping centre offers us a most comprehensive and revealing insight as to the state of modern society. The immediate social and cultural divides are exemplified via separations which are reassuringly distinct and subtly enforced. The behemoth of materialism is such that it undermines and simultaneously fuels the overwhelming need to assume a persona. The deity-like voice of big brother announces to us the inadequacy of individuality and being ourselves. Mere presence in such havens is enough to subtly yet inextricably reinforce the unrelenting belief that “I” does not exist without “we”. Labels are necessary when defining any product, more sensitive however when applied to people of reason and (un)-consciousness. Identity theft is a criminal offence; can any of us conceive of buying our personality back from the thief? This is undoubtedly the source of the ultimate offence the modern Shopping centre stands accountable for. Incessant advertising and the proliferation of indoctrinated images of perfection contribute to the ultimate sentiment “you are not good enough” delivered by the modern shopping centre.

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply