15 Indications You May Be a Micro Manager.

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Micromanaging is a management style where the manager of a fully competent team spends time trying to control the details of the work being done by the competent staff, rather than focusing on the tactical responsibilities of the office. Though there are times all managers must dig into the details of an assignment to verify the work is being done properly, excessive detail concern may be a sign of micro managing. This type of micro management style may lead to unhappy and unfulfilled staff members and a decrease in quality work. Here is a list of things you should watch for if you have been told you are a difficult manager with micro managing tendencies. 

  1. You believe that being a manager means you must have more knowledge and skills than your subordinates.
  2. You believe you can perform all the tasks assigned to your staff better than they can.
  3. You believed deadlines, quality, responsibility and performance are more important to you then they are to your staff.
  4. You believed it is more effective for you to do a task than it would be to assign the task to a staff member. Liability for an incomplete project is always a key concern.
  5. You can always find something wrong with what a staff member has completed and you tend to suffer from a “red pen” syndrome.
  6. You believe that unlike everyone you work with, you never make mistakes and your work is always better than anyone else could do.
  7. You don’t allow your staff to learn from their own mistakes as you usually take over when a project is not going well.
  8. You tend to spend too much time overseeing simple projects in fear that they will not be done “your way”.
  9. You are “overworked” while your staff is looking for projects to do.
  10. You are the first one in the office and the last one to go home – always.
  11. Even on vacation or when you are at home sick, you call the office twice a day (or more) to make sure everything is okay.
  12. Your team appears to have very little initiative and will not take on new projects without asking you first.
  13. Your staff is afraid they will fail or will do something incorrectly and therefore they take a great deal of time to complete even the simplest tasks.
  14. Your workers feel unmotivated, depressed and underappreciated.
  15. You have been called controlling, judgmental, doctorial or untrusting by family and friends (and sometimes by brave co-workers).  

If you agree whole-heartedly to many of the above statements, you may be guilty of micromanaging. There are many things you can do to relinquish your unyielding hold on each project and to allow your staff to grow in confidence and abilities. 

  • Ask your family and friends their opinions of your communication style.
  • Discuss your style with your manager or another supervisor and get their feed back as to how you run your office.
  • Something as simple as asking a person to do something and not telling them to do a task may break that hold you have on being in charge at all costs. Give suggestions, not just orders.
  • Leave on time at least once a week.
  • Be the first one out the door at least one a month.
  • Think less about “how” a task is done and concentrate more on the finished product instead. Do not be so quick to judge the finished project.
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