Grow Up; Not Old!

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It’s really OK to grunt & groan; it helps!

What is it about growing older that seems to unite those of us in the middle-age group? I think it’s that “sense” we all seem to get around the age of 45-50; some get it earlier, some later; largely dependent on prior habits, choices and lifestyles, of course!

Funny, too, how that “middle-age group” changes its range as we get older.  When I was in my 20s and 30s, I was sure middle-age didn’t begin until at least the middle 50s.  Now, at late 50s, I think I’m still in middle-age; since I’ve stretched the range out to about 75 or so.

Things You’ll Need:

* Patience

* Forgiveness

* Kindness

* Tolerance

* Acceptance

* In a word: Lots of Love.

The Stages We Share:

My wife and I are in our late 50’s, and for several years now we’ve both been keenly aware of that phenomenon of growing older.

The Growing Pains:

We frequently comment about how important it is to grunt and groan now, especially when trying to get into or out of a vehicle, or when trying to lift a heavy object. And, don’t forget, heavy is a relative term; where I once lifted 50 lbs with ease, I now can lift only 40, or 30 or 20; OK, so it’s more like 10; what can I say?

The Senior Moments:

And, we wonder about our inability to remember some things we know we should remember. Like when we see an acquaintance we haven’t seen for quite a while and can’t remember their name! How embarrassing is that?!

The Outstretched Arms:

Then, there’s the proverbial arm’s-reach-reading we do. When we try seeing the fine print for the ingredients on food and drink products we’re buying, we sometimes ask each other to hold the package because it needs to be beyond our own reach, in order for us to see it clearly.

The Power Catnaps:

Then, there’s the occasional falling asleep in the recliners , the creaking-bones when climbing stairs, the aching back when operating the vacuum cleaner, the tired feet after standing on hard floors, the aching muscles after a normal day at the beach; all that walking in sand, y’know?

Did I mention reading ingredients?

Yes, I know I did. Even the fact we are now even reading the ingredients says something about growing old, for sure.

After all, when we were young and our arteries were much clearer and our bones much stronger and our minds much less cluttered and our backs less worn out and our joints more flexible and even our hair and teeth and hearing more keenly fresh, we didn’t have to think about it.

Making The Best of It All:

We have come to the conclusion that growing old might not always be fun and games, but it still offers opportunities to continue growing UP and learning new things , even about how our aging bodies talk back more these days!

I think we have also realized that the aging process is inevitable as long as we’re alive, and the key is to make the very best and very most of every moment in time.

Of course, that means something different for everyone , but if we can learn to think of the glass as half-full as much as possible, we will stand more chance of enjoying ourselves for as long as possible!

Carpe Diem — every moment of every day!

Tips & Warnings

* Enjoy, laugh, love, live!

* Be thankful, with praise!

* Smiling uses less muscle than frowning!

* Share, with all around!

* Making the most of every moment of every day can be addictive; proceed with caution and watch for warning signs of elation, giddiness, euphoria, happiness or other pleasurable sensations and feelings.

* Practice at your own risk.

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