The Enlightenment Of Europe: How it Greatly Influences Us Today.

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The Enlightenment of Europe greatly changed the way people viewed the world in many aspects. Whether it be in religion, government, liberty, or woman’s rights, there was a philosopher there to criticize. Despite the reaction some Enlightened thinkers received, they continued to try to change or improve what they believed needed to be restructured. Without the Enlightenment, bad government styles, the rights of women, and natural right may not be in use today.

A rather important face of the “Age of Reason” was the English philosopher John Locke. John challenged old ideas in the late 1600s. John argued that the right to rule a kingdom via selection of God was an outright false impression. He tried to convey the message that power arose from the people, not an unjust ruler, or a God. Locke longed for a government that protected the “natural rights” of mankind. He said life, liberty, and property are engraved in the foundation of human. He encouraged people to revolt if a ruler of authority fails to protect their natural rights. Thanks to Locke’s thinking, he influenced the writers of the Declaration of Independence.

An Enlightened thinker, and priest, Abbé Raynal was another well-known, and highly affective philosopher. Abbe rooted for anti-slavery; in both religion and law fields. He pushed for liberty as the possession of every man. From liberty, he reasoned, branched off natural liberty, political liberty, as well as civil liberty. In other words, he agreed to letting man live freely as long as he does not interfere with the law. In addition to the state of people whom do not lack their political authority. As a preacher of God, he humbly stated “God is my father, and not my master; I am his child, and not his slave.” Meaning he highly respects the idea of God, however, he is not completely in charge of every little thing he can and cannot do. Raynal believed you can be God’s “child” or follower, and look up to him without the tendency of hanging on his every word–teachings. Moreover, Abbe disagrees with slavery because it simply demolishes natural liberty.

A massive argument you may have heard in an Enlightened town could have been the rights of women. Many Enlightened thinkers urged on equal rights to women compared to men. One of said thinkers was ruler of Russia, Catherine II- better known as “Catherine the Great”. Not only did she develop a variety of advancements in Russia, such as: opening hospitals, supporting arts, and setting up a system of government coated with the ideas of the famous philosopher Montesquieu, but she had introduced education to more female girls by opening a school for girls. Which, at the time, education was one of the main priorities of things to gain rights to for women.

Along with Catherine the Great, was the popular French women, Marie Thérèse Rodet Geoffrin. Hosting salons, Marie influenced many men and women in creating equal rights for women. Her salons opened the opportunity of limited education for women who normally had no way of receiving education. To elaborate on how successful she was, faces such as Montesquieu and Voltaire attended her salons to reason with and listen to what she had on her mind.

Women commonly used reason to argue for equal rights to prove their potential. As well as write books and articles about their desire for rights. Such women being American, Judith Sargent Murray who wrote that women for which lacked education also lacked in self-confidence, and Mary Wollstonecraft who wrote “A Vindication of the Rights of Women”. Which was an essay stating well-educated women would help create enlightened families.

Lastly, German philosopher, Johan Gottlieb, had tried to convey the message that no one had the right to “determine the objects of our inquiry or set limits to it…hinder us from communicating its results… to whomever or however we wish.” With this, he wanted freedom of research, whether it be of another God, way of life, or scientific thoughts from another point of view. He believed people had the right to expand their knowledge of the word around them, and be able to share with others. Johan wanted people of his time to realize they have the potential to discover important features and needs, even if the church was against it.

The Enlightenment was truly a breakout era of the European philosophers, and mankind. The talented minds of mentioned icons sculpted a path of freedom of individuality. We, as a nation, owe big thanks to the people who built the guild of living as we know it today.

The Enlightenment of Europe greatly changed the way people viewed the world in many aspects. Whether it be in religion, government, liberty, or woman’s rights, there was a philosopher there to criticize. Despite the reaction some Enlightened thinkers received, they continued to try to change or improve what they believed needed to be restructured. Without the Enlightenment, bad government styles, the rights of women, and natural right may not be in use today.
A rather important face of the “Age of Reason” was the English philosopher John Locke. John challenged old ideas in the late 1600s.  John argued that the right to rule a kingdom via selection of God was an outright false impression. He tried to convey the message that power arose from the people, not an unjust ruler, or a God. Locke longed for a government that protected the “natural rights” of mankind. He said life, liberty, and property are engraved in the foundation of human. He encouraged people to revolt if a ruler of authority fails to protect their natural rights. Thanks to Locke’s thinking, he influenced the writers of the Declaration of Independence.
An Enlightened thinker, and priest, Abbé Raynal was another well-known, and highly affective philosopher. Abbe rooted for anti-slavery; in both religion and law fields. He pushed for liberty as the possession of every man. From liberty, he reasoned, branched off natural liberty, political liberty, as well as civil liberty. In other words, he agreed to letting man live freely as long as he does not interfere with the law. In addition to the state of people whom do not lack their political authority. As a preacher of God, he humbly stated “God is my father, and not my master; I am his child, and not his slave.” Meaning he highly respects the idea of God, however, he is not completely in charge of every little thing he can and cannot do. Raynal believed you can be God’s “child” or follower, and look up to him without the tendency of hanging on his every word–teachings. Moreover, Abbe disagrees with slavery because it simply demolishes natural liberty.
A massive argument you may have heard in an Enlightened town could have been the rights of women. Many Enlightened thinkers urged on equal rights to women compared to men. One of said thinkers was ruler of Russia, Catherine II- better known as “Catherine the Great”. Not only did she develop a variety of advancements in Russia, such as: opening hospitals, supporting arts, and setting up a system of government coated with the ideas of the famous philosopher Montesquieu, but she had introduced education to more female girls by opening a school for girls. Which, at the time,  education was one of the main priorities of  things to gain rights to for women.
Along with Catherine the Great, was the popular French women, Marie Thérèse Rodet Geoffrin. Hosting salons, Marie influenced many men and women in creating equal rights for women. Her salons opened the opportunity of limited education for women who normally had no way of receiving education. To elaborate on how successful she was, faces such as Montesquieu and Voltaire attended her salons to reason with and listen to what she had on her mind.
Women commonly used reason to argue for equal rights to prove their potential. As well as write books and articles about their desire for rights. Such women being American, Judith Sargent Murray who wrote that women for which lacked education also lacked in self-confidence, and Mary Wollstonecraft who wrote “A Vindication of the Rights of Women”. Which was an essay stating well-educated women would help create enlightened families.
Lastly, German philosopher, Johan Gottlieb, had tried to convey the message that no one had the right to “determine the objects of our inquiry or set limits to it…hinder us from communicating its results… to whomever or however we wish.” With this, he wanted freedom of research, whether it be of another God, way of life, or scientific thoughts from another point of view. He believed people had the right to expand their knowledge of the word around them, and be able to share with others. Johan wanted people of his time to realize they have the potential to discover important features and needs, even if the church was against it.
The Enlightenment was truly a breakout era of the European philosophers, and mankind. The talented minds of mentioned icons sculpted a path of freedom of individuality. We, as a nation, owe big thanks to the people who built the guild of living as we know it today.

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