How to Keep Your Child Learning This Summer

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Studies have shown that over the summer, children tend to lose a lot of what they learned during the school year. The first several weeks back at school turn into long review sessions. You can easily keep your child’s mind active this summer so that less review is necessary.

Confer with your child’s teacher.
</p>

At the last parent-teacher conference of the school year, ask your child’s teacher what you can do at home. See if there are any areas that need to be improved upon over the summer. Ask in what your child excels and about what she is the most excited. Find out what will be expected next school year. Use these tips to your advantage.

Look for one-on-one summer instruction.
</p>

Parents try to give their children projects or homework to do over the summer. Often, children resist working for their parents. Try to enlist the help of a tutor. Tutoring sessions don’t necessarily need to be for remedial work. They can also serve as enriching experiences to expand your child’s knowledge in a given area. Many teachers are looking for summer work and enjoy working one-on-one with a student. Some high school and college students would also enjoy working one-on-one with your child, and may be more affordable. Some universities and churches also offer affordable, one-on-one sessions in the summer.

Check out local summer camp programs.
</p>

Ask for information on summer programs from many resources in your community. Inquire at the local YMCA, museums, parks, and universities. Local churches often open up their programs to the community. Several schools also offer fun summer programs. Check with neighbors and friends for their favorites, as well.

Go to your local library.
</p>

Many local libraries offer summer reading programs for children. They can earn points for great rewards. Older children can practice their research skills by looking up one of their favorite topics and making projects about it.

Read together.
</p>

Older children, even those who can read on their own, still like to have stories read to them. Choose some of your favorite chapter books from your childhood and read them aloud to your children. Let them choose some of their favorites for you.

Encourage the use of a journal.
</p>

Let your child choose a special notebook and writing utensil. Encourage her to write something in her journal on a daily basis. If she isn’t sure what to write, give her a topic.

Use workbooks.
</p>

You can collect pages from your child’s teacher. You can search local stores for pre-made workbooks. Search online for free, printable worksheets that you compile into a notebook.

Take a stay-cation in your city.
</p>

Visit your city like a tourist, checking out local museums and attractions. Get a history lesson while having fun!

Create learning experiences at home.
</p>

Take advantage of staying at home. Learn about science through gardening and observing critters in your yard. Try out science experiments in your kitchen. Teach your children how to cook and perform household chores.

Volunteer.
</p>

Find ways to volunteer in your town. Pet shelters need people to walk dogs. Hospitals and nursing homes could use help visiting and caring for the elderly. Food kitchens need help cooking. Collect food to take to a local food shelter. These experiences will help your child grow emotionally, as well.Ask for information on summer programs from many resources in your community. Inquire at the local YMCA, museums, parks, and universities. Local churches often open up their programs to the community. Several schools also offer fun summer programs. Check with neighbors and friends for their favorites, as well.

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply